Article By Ian Alexander

To get the trolley to run as far back towards the stern as possible I’ve made use of the rudder mounting holes and fitted a plate that I made from 3mm stainless steel plate. This was an idea I got from a post on the AA site. Along with some shock cord (bungy) and a small pulley this made up the rear fixing.

fitting an ocean kayak anchor trolley

Here it is fitted to the stern

kayak anchoring

For the front of the pulley I threaded some shock cord through the deck rigging fixing block and attached another small pulley identical to the one at the rear of the pulley. The shock cord looks a tight fit in the block but it goes through easily enough if you pull the rigging tight to make room for it to pass through the holes. I must mention that the cut ends of the shock cord and also the ends of the 6mm trolley cord were melted slightly with a lighter to stop them fraying and working loose.

anchoring your fishing kayak

I threaded some 6mm cord through the pulleys and tied each end of the cord to a small stainless steel ring on the bottom side of the pulleys. The cord was tied off ensuring that the shock cords were under a bit of tension, you will know when it feels right.

anchor trolley

When I was in the chandlers I noticed these little plastic balls that fit over the knots to protect them, I have used them on the knots at the ring and on the bungy at the rear bracket. I don’t know what they are called but I think they make a neat job and only cost 30 pence each.

When I first rigged up my trolley it would pull up and across the the tankwell, this wasn’t a real problem but looked a bit untidy so I ran the top run of the trolley through a couple of pad eyes to keep it neat. The pad eyes are screwed in place with some stainless steel self tapping screws, a blob of Silkaflex sealant on the threads makes it watertight, not that this is realy required but it finishes the job.

The bottom run of the trolley would be kept it place by the kayak handle but just to make it all a bit neater I turned (on a lathe) some “bobbins” out of some scrap offcuts of nylon and fitted one to each side of the handle, this made a nice and tidy path for the bottom run of the trolley to travel over. I again used a blob of Silkaflex on the bottom of the “bobbins” to make it watertight and also to stop the screws coming loose.

The “bobbins” are also used for locking the trolley in position, when the trolley is pulled to the front or back a turn of the cord around the “bobbin” makes sure that the trolley stays put…….nice and easy.

The Anchor System

For my anchor line I bought some 3mm cord on the internet auction site and made my own winder out of some scrap plywood which I varnished several times. I also bought a 7inch buoy from the same auction site and attached it to my winder. I got the idea of the buoy from an excellent post that Spawny bass has in the kayak section of this site, thanks Dave.

I fitted a quick release cam cleat to the side of my kayak to hold the anchor line. Using the base of the cam cleat as a template I cut a fixing block out of some scrap nylon, you could use a piece cut from a nylon or plastic chopping board. The cleat is fastened through the kayak and onto this fixing block…..nice and solid. A little bit of Silkaflex sealant on the top of the block again made sure it was all sealed.

I have a small 0.75kg anchor which is attached to a couple of yards of chain, I think that this will be enough for where I am going. I have rigged the anchor “bridle fashion”. This is still a bit untidy as I need some better cord to rig it up neater, I may also try the cable tie weak link method so still some work in progress on this part.

In use the anchor line is looped through the ring on the trolley and held in place with the cam cleat. This will let me release the anchor very quickly, if I need to……the buoy will keep the anchor line afloat so that I can go back to it.

Here is a mock up of it in use in my garden…..not an ideal photo but just so you get the idea.

All of my bits and pieces, (screws, pulleys, shock cord, 6mm cord, pad eyes and so on), I got from my local chandlers Trident marine.

I hope that this post is of some use to anyone thinking of a similar setup on their kayak. I’m still a novice kayaker and as such I’ll probably change a few things as I try them and become more familiar with my kayak.

I have also fitted some Ram rod holders and a Humminbird fishfinder…….I’ll put some more posts up later this week

Regards Ian