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Winter Pictures

Discussion in 'Photography Forum' started by GJW, Jan 11, 2010.

  1. GJW

    GJW Rockling

    Well not been fishing for awhile so went out for a walk in the snow with our Sam, Katie and dog Lucy, took the camera along and took a few pics no fish ones though... :whistle:

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    A few pics our Katie took with my old compact camera..

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    Well i cant seem to catch any fish at the moment so i might as well take some photo's.. :embarrass:

    Tightlines
     
  2. harrythecod

    harrythecod Rockling

    some cracking pics there Garry, :yes:what is the lens you have on there for the close ups of the squirrell and birds ,
     
  3. Baramundi Bob

    Baramundi Bob Super Leeds United !!!

    Superb quality snaps Garry. They are fantastic mate.
     
  4. ducky

    ducky maybe one day...

    nice pictures gary,
     
  5. mattylamb

    mattylamb Rockling

    lovely pics gary
     
  6. Baramundi Bob

    Baramundi Bob Super Leeds United !!!

    You seem to have really mastered the depth of field garry (Focussed foreground with blurred background). How are you doing that ?? Is it something to do with aperture ??
     
  7. Sambo

    Sambo To the MAX!

    Cracking pics Gary, the close up pics of the birds are excellent :cool:
     
  8. snapperspike

    snapperspike New Member

    Yep, your quite right Bob, it's a "trick" us pro's have used for YEARS !!
    The larger the aperture (careful now, Larger apertures are SMALLER f no's !!) the less the depth of field. As in, with an aperture of F2.8, you get a very shallow depth of field. This effect increases DRAMATICALLY, with the focal length of the lens. If you use a 300mm lens at f2.8 (only about £3500 !!) like I used for years, or even a 400mm, then you get the "classic" sports/candid shots you see in all the publications. The other advantage of a "fast" lens of big focal length and large aperture, is being to use them in low light situations. That's why pro's will spend a lot of money for these lenses, to be able to shoot in normally impossible light levels, and control depth of field for isolation of the subject. WHEW !! hope that wasn't TOO long winded !!!

    Cheers

    Spike
     
  9. harrythecod

    harrythecod Rockling

    Very good lesson spike ,small number ,bigger hole for the light to get in ,so let me get this right ,if you put the camera on a tripod and set it to bulb, you can get close to the subject and maualy set the time the shutter is open :confused:
     
  10. big cliff

    big cliff Rockling

    Smashing photos gary you have got a couple of lovelly nieces there , im sure the fish will be coming your way before to long i will have to get you
    on solly cliff
     
  11. snapperspike

    snapperspike New Member

    Very good lesson spike ,small number ,bigger hole for the light to get in ,so let me get this right ,if you put the camera on a tripod and set it to bulb, you can get close to the subject and maualy set the time the shutter is open :confused:
    [/quote]

    Well, sort of, but not really !
    If you use "bulb", it stems from the days when you USED A BULB (of air), to keep the shutter open for as long as you wanted. Nowdays, it generally means setting this setting, and manually keeping your finger on the shutter button untill your finger drops off :laugh: :laugh:
    The main use, is for exposures longer than you can set normally on your camera (say longer than 30 secs) BUT, you are then into having to "guess" the correct exposure.
    However, with digital now, you can see instantly, what the pic looks like, where in my younger days, you had to wait untill you had developed the film, and printed a pic :cry: :cry: :cry:
    Made you pretty good at guessing night exposures though :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: One problem with keeping your finger on the camera button is of course camera shake, so usually you would use a remote release to avoid this.
    Don't forget as well Harry, that if your shooting night scenes of buildings, you need a "middling" aperture setting, to get everything sharp, so manual settings are best, but a little more tricky. That's why one guy said he started at 30 sec exposure (at whatever aperture you want to try) and then added time to the exposure, and looked at the pic, untill he got the result he wanted. REMEMBER, the relation between aperture, and shutter speed, can change, but there is only one combination that will give the correct exposure. Doesn't matter if you set bulb and keep the shutter open for 5 mins, as long as you have a small enough aperture to allow that time, with the correct exposure. It's a juggling act Harry when you think about it, or as confucius would say " the ying and yang must be in balance - grasshopper" !!!!
    Hope this makes sense Harry

    Spike
     
  12. Ian Alexander

    Ian Alexander Whitby Fishing Forum _ Simply The Best

    Great photos Gary, also some good tips in this thread.......thanks lads.
    Regards Ian
     
  13. harrythecod

    harrythecod Rockling

    Think i got what your saying spike ,i will read it untill it gets locked in my memory , :confused:
     
  14. GJW

    GJW Rockling

    Hi Glenn, i am only learning so cant give you much advice but by going on the qaulity of your pics which are very good indeed i dont think you need advice from me, i am just playing about with the settings trying diffrent things.

    I use for instance if i was taking a picture of a landscape manually i would opt for a slow shutter speed with a high aperture (small iris closed in) which will absorb the light at a slow rate which inturn should give you a better depth of field...high f number.

    If you want an action shot (motor racing) etc very fast shutter speed with low aperture the iris wide open low f number...

    I took the wildlife pics on a Tamron lense AF70-300 tele Macro(1:2)

    Tightlines
     
  15. harrythecod

    harrythecod Rockling

    Thanks for the info Garry , :yes: i will google it and see what the specs are, i did try to zoom in on a moorhen in the park on saterday but couldnt get close without spooking it :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:.
     
  16. harrythecod

    harrythecod Rockling

    Jus thad google on that lens garry, you wont believe the difference in price,sony start at £201for a 75-300 and price searcher only finds it as low as £179, i have found it at £99 free delivery :surprise:
     
  17. Supersonic

    Supersonic Whitby Bass Club

    Great pics Gary, really good quality.

    Noticed the lens wasn't the kit lens supplied and was going to ask about it!

    Harry where have you seen that lense so cheap? Is it a sony lens?
     
  18. Dav

    Dav Rockling

    Top Quality pics there Gaz lad , There real proffesional looking, keep em coming .........:yes: :yes: :cool:
     
  19. Crab Nut

    Crab Nut Whitby Fishing Forum _ Simply The Best

    top pics there garry (as usual). but bloody hell lads i thought me head was going to explode with all that tech info- no wonder the standard of all the pics on this forum is first class with all you tech wiz kids- and here's me thinking all i have to do is point my £1 disposable camara to get pics just as good. (ha ha)
     

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