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Tide Turns / Slack water ?

Discussion in 'Sea Fishing Forum - Shore, Boat & Kayak Fishing' started by THE DOLPHIN, Sep 17, 2009.

  1. bigcod

    bigcod Rockling

    Slack water depends as to just where you are beleive it of not its nearly 1 hour after on the end of the peir whitby high water is whitby bridge if its high at 7pm you still have tide running after 7.30 pm on the end of the peir the bell bouy is near on 2 hours after and anything upto 3 hours further off but on tides as big as these 6.0 you dont really see any slack as for example if you are out on the 3mile the tide runs in different stages from top to bottom i would say there is easyly well over 1 hour between top and the bottom for high water so when you think it is say high water on the top the tide is allready going the other way on the bottom you see this more easyly on big tides as even when there is little of no wind as the tides begins to ease on the bottom and is still runnig hard on the surface your lines start to stream very badly then you start to leave your lead behind on the bottom and the boats is still racing away on the surface places like robin hoods bay ness end you have 4or 5 different tide runs coming at you out of the bay the tide actually boils on the surface as the diffently tides meet the salmoners have a name for it they call it the worry gut this happens about about 400yds off the ness end and is very spooky on tides as big as these .
    I actully learnt a lot about tides when went salmon netting quite a few years i did a few weeks off whitby beach with any marr who in them days used to fish the whitby club we had our salmon netts shot at the bottom off raven hill which is just as you come into sandsend high water in the book was 3pm now you fish best with tide running so at approx 1 .30pm andy said come letts haul the netts in its high water we need to move the netts down to newholm beck which is about half amile away i said its not high water yet andy said the tides at the green end as the salmoners called it is nearly one and half hours before when went over the the netts andy was bang on the netts were limp in the water he said its actaully one and half hours after at newholm beck thats nearly 3 hours different in half a mile its hard to beleive but he was right i was gobsmacked its all to do with the bay you have different tides runs going in and out out off the bay when i come in from the north side of the bay towards whitby with my boat when you are on the flood you atuall get what you call an outset which is the tide hitting the peirs and then running out to sea when you get say half a mile north side off the bouy when you are comeing towards whitby the boats actually starts to slow down in the water as the outset hits you its strange when you think the tide is actually flooding and is suppose to be going in over.
     
  2. THE DOLPHIN

    THE DOLPHIN Rockling

    Thanks for your replie Paul I was talking to Kevin of Jean K yesterday and he says about the same as you. Thanks to everyone how replied to this post interesting how alot think differently. Tight lines all Chris
     
  3. Kayak13

    Kayak13 Whitby Fishing Forum _ Simply The Best

    Interesting stuff Bigcod and having considered this very informative article on calculating slack times I have to agree that slack times are totally dependant on where you are and not on the water levels.
    http://www.bsac-se.org.uk/Slacks.asp

    Seems slack can be very close to either HW or LW or hours away as you guys are saying. Perhaps this explains why there is such a difference of opinion.

    Very, very interesting this and grateful for the input everyone has put into this.
    I assumed everywhere would be the same that the HW / LW were prerry much the same as slack water but looks like this could be the exception rather than the rule.
    Learn something new every day :happy:
     
  4. November XIII

    November XIII Catch the fish you love - love the fish you catch!

    There are tidal stream maps / atlas's available which show the tide flows in relation to a number of ports.

    If you also check out a Nautical Almanac such as Reeds, they're normally shown and you can work out everything you need to know. ie High and Low water times, tidal flow directions and slack water times etc.
     
  5. THE DOLPHIN

    THE DOLPHIN Rockling

    Alright George I have a reeds Natical Almanac on the boat but its out of date I must put one on my christmas presy list. Mind all the charts are still in there.
    Chris
     
  6. Supersonic

    Supersonic Whitby Bass Club

    Very interesting read that was Bigcod :)
     

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