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KAYAK ANCHORING - How to safely anchor your kayak

Discussion in 'Sea Fishing Forum - Shore, Boat & Kayak Fishing' started by newdave, Feb 22, 2009.

  1. steerser

    steerser Blenny

    Re: kayak anchoring

    Sorry about that mate..i was certain that was what you lads were talking about, be interesting to see simon's method..
    been thinking though, if you lads use a light enough set up, theres no reason why an alderney rig wouldn't work.. :wink:
     
  2. robq

    robq Rockling

    Re: kayak anchoring

    I agree mate and you have got me thinking now !!

    Simons method of rigging the anchor coupled with a small alderney ring setup would eliminate the need to have to haul the anchor which can be quite hard with a 1.5kg anchor with the wide blades, especially in 50ft + water :yes:

    Cheers

    Rob
     
  3. steerser

    steerser Blenny

    Re: kayak anchoring

    1.5kg is a big anchor for a yak mate!..we only used 2kg for a warrior 165..won't take much to hold bottom with the weight you lads carry..use plenty of chain :yes:
     
  4. Dorado

    Dorado New Member

    Re: kayak anchoring

    Steerser - the trouble with the Alderney ring system for a kayak is the power input....you haven't got any in a kayak!

    We tried this a few years ago when we were anchoring in over 400 feet for skate off Loch Aline, near Oban. We tried it in shallower water too, and it still didn't work because the drag on the anchror warp brings the kayak up all standing before you can lift the anchor off the bottom.

    If anyone is in doubt as to how little drag it needs to stop a kayak - just put a brace of mackerel in a net over the side and try to paddle....you won't be going very far!

    My system is similar to Spawney's in that I don't like hauling against the tide, because otherwise you are snubbed the whole time you are weighing anchor. I paddle back up the tide/wind to over my anchor, with the anchor haul still deployed to the stern of the kayak - then keep going, keep going until you come up all standing against the anchor on the UPTIDE side. As soon as you stop paddling you begin to drift down towards your ground tackle. You can now haul the anchor fairlead (carabiner most use) to alongside your cockpit where you can deal with it. DO NOT TAKE THE WARP OUT OF IT YET THOUGH. Haul the warp very quickly by hand as there is NO pressure on it. You are drifting down towards the anchor remember.

    The warp should be paid out overside as you bring it in, hand over hand, and out again, so there is a large bight of warp in the tide astern of you (it doesn't drift as fast) until the anchor warp is straight down, now you just have to lift the anchor off the bottom - you might have to break it out a bit by holding, the kayak will help with the tide on the side - but you have the option of just dropping the lot and releasing the pressure because of that great bight of warp out, you don't even come up on the anchor again immediately. You have the time that it takes to straighten all your warp (another good reason to pay out plenty when you anchor) to run the carabiner back to the stern (the first thing you should do!) and then pick up your paddle and repeat the process. If you do come back on the anchor you will be doing it from a normal anchoring position at the stern, so the kayak will sit stern to, and not in a capsize position - which is very possible if you come beam on to the tide. This happens if you leave the haul at the cockpit or try to haul while there is pressure on the anchor warp.

    Normally, even if the anchor is well buried, it will come out first go using this method. I prefer my anchor setting to a whip or cable tie type trip because it cannot let go inadvertantly - I have been using the system for over 30 years on kayaks and boats and have only ever lost one anchor. The system works, simple as that - so does the tied off tripping method, but mine cannot let go accidentally, which does happen quite frequently with whipping trips or cable tie trips. Boats get washed ahsore all the time at night where people have their anchor trip while they are asleep....ok not kayak fishing, but if it can let go at all, sods law dictates it will do so at the most inopportune time.

    I don't have any pics of my anchor set up - but it is one of the things we cover on the sit-on-top course, together with safe techniques for rigging an anchor haul on the kayak (mine come ready done!). The buoyed off system is great and I use a similar quick slip to Spawney with a Gibbs Shackle - my old frame isn't as smart as his plywood one though. I did have plans for something along those lines, but not quite like - I like Dave's better than what I had started to cut out...so I am going to start again!

    One difference that quickly comes to notice is the amount of anchor warp you lot are carrying....I carry 200m on my frame winder. I will always deploy plenty, especially if there is a fast tide - to give bags of time when weighing anchor if you have to let go and start again. I have my buoy on a short line with a carabiner and just hitch into a bight taken around the frame at the point I tie off for the depth. The Gibbs slip is then clipped to a loop on the frame and a lanyard run to the cockpit - if I need to let go I just pull the lanyard and I am free.

    I'll get some pictures of the anchor set up - but imagine a bridle running from the toe of the anchor to the head of the anchor stock. Not tight, but just loose enough to give about 1" of free play at either end when the chain is pulled tight. The chain is shackled to this bridle, so it can run up and down it freely from one end to the other.

    When you drop anchor, the chain will pull to the head of the anchor and lay normally, with the pull straight along the shank as if it were attached to the eye of the anchor. When you paddle up tide, then paddle against the pull of the anchor, you drag the chain along the bridle to the toe of the anchor, by the flukes. This is the wrong end if you like - and pulls the anchor out the way it went in. When you lift straight up as you drift over the top you lift the anchor off th ebottom - sometimes upside down, sometimes the right way up, that depends on the strength of the tide, the water can pull the anchor the right way round on the way up, but by then it is broken free anyway.
     
  5. carpyken

    carpyken New Member

    Re: kayak anchoring

    Rob, a couple of us tried with the alderney method but we don't have enough momentum or power - especially when paddling uptide.

    Steerser, we have tried with the lighter anchors but over soft sand they won't grip, even with a chain (you can get away with a lighter one over rough ground), I think a lot of it has to do with the drag on the rope through the tide rather than just the size/weight of the vessel

    Ken
     
  6. Dorado

    Dorado New Member

    Re: kayak anchoring

    meant to say - it works for boats too, only you use the motor, not the paddles!
     
  7. robq

    robq Rockling

    Re: kayak anchoring

    Cheers Simon :happy:
     
  8. newdave

    newdave Guest

    Re: kayak anchoring

    yes thanks simon, looking forward to seeing the photo but i have just worked out what you mean, looks like i will be update updating my system. thanks mate I will knock you up a nice new handle :wink:

    on the anchor size, 1.5kg is over the top for rock, but its the smallest one that scarborough marine stock :yes:
     
  9. robq

    robq Rockling

    Re: kayak anchoring

    I have just ordered a 0.7kg one from kildale marine in Hull. Just over a fiver :yes:
     
  10. carpyken

    carpyken New Member

    Re: kayak anchoring

    Get it sorted Spawney, I'm still more than happy tieing off on you-much easier and I've not lost an anchor yet through doing this :whistle: - just don't ask me to tow you uptide while your retrieving anchors :wink:
     
  11. newdave

    newdave Guest

  12. Dorado

    Dorado New Member

    Re: kayak anchoring

    The 0.75 anchors work to a poin - but you need a minimum of 2 fathoms of chain (4m) and even then it is a bit touch and go in strong tides.

    I have 2 st ups which I keep in the gear bag...decide which on the day according to conditions.

    0.75 with 2 fathoms of chain is on 2mm kite line. Doesn't hold well in strong tides even over rock - not reliable, it will snag and hold, but you can spend 3 or 4 attempts before getting it to hold.

    1.5kg on same 2 fathoms of chain, 4mm line. Don't use thin line with a heavy anchor...it will be very uncomfortable to lift as the line digs into your hand. Hence the heavier line on th eheavy setup....not for strength, just for comfort.
     
  13. GRAWLER

    GRAWLER Guest

    Ive been reading these posts about about anchoring yaks,there are some good ideas which will all work in their own way.
    but everyones seems to be missing a few points.the main problem were having is the anchor DESIGN! the folding grapnel design isn't efficient enough in soft bottoms the surface area isn't large enough!
    whats needed is an anchor with the right surface area as well as the right spade angle.
    if you get these two properties right you can REDUCE WEIGHT,REDUCE THE 3 TO 1 RATIO OF THE ANCHOR ROPE LENGTH TO THE DEPTH THUS GIVING MORE HOLDING POWER.
    if someone has the time to play around with this idea I'm sure they could crack it.make a very light folding anchor thats easy to produce that will hold in sand as well as rough ground that we can retrieve from a yak.I made a aluminium one once for a friend who had a boat (19ft) and it would hold fast in most strong tides,you could retrieve it easy by hand as it only weighed about 1lb! I don't have the facilities anymore to make one and ally isn't cheap.
    i used to build anchors when i worked as an engineer, i worked on anchors up to 40 tons! yes 40 tons,mainly for the offshore oil industry but i also worked on small versions for the military :secret:
    heres a small one,
    http://www.menkent.dk/assistpics/22ton2.jpg

    heres another link which may help to get some ideas of what i mean

    http://www.creativemarine.com/newprodct/anchor%20test/soft_mud_bottom_anchor_test.htm

    have a look at the super max's.I'm not saying go over the top and spend a fortune in time and money at the end of the day they are throw aways when yak fishing.
    The skippers from whitby could do with looking at anchoring up to fish wrecks then we can all go congerin :yes: :yes: :yes: might even get a record cod or ling and even £10.000 :yes: :yes: :yes:
    thanks

    ps forgot to mention some tw*t nicked the anchor i made and i want it back :death: :evil:
     
  14. Baramundi Bob

    Baramundi Bob Super Leeds United !!!

    Were you in the sbs ?
     
  15. GRAWLER

    GRAWLER Guest

    I'm only a very poor cnc engineer/programmer :cry:but the company i worked for specialised in anchors.
     
  16. Baramundi Bob

    Baramundi Bob Super Leeds United !!!

    What is cnc engineer/programmer ?

    Sorry for being nosey.
     
  17. SAGE

    SAGE always trying...... some say very trying !!!!!

    cnc means computer numerical control....

    a very basic and simple way of describing it is ...imagine playing battleships....a grid 10 by 10 .....a,b,c, on latitude... 1,2,3,on longtitude .....you need to send your torpedo to blow up a ship ...so you programme it to go to a1. (corner square) ....that is 2 axis

    imagine playing it with a cube and each square box now has an extra command for height ....that is 3 axis

    hope you understand that......cos it gets more complicated as you get to 5 axis

    i think thats how it goes hope it helps
    Paul
     
  18. stephen

    stephen Guest

    If there's 2 of you , you can use a variation of the alderney method. We did this at Crinan because we were anchored in 400feet of water and hauling the anchor in the traditional way would have taken ages. 2 kayakers. One acts as rope feeder (me in this case), whilst the more gullible one (Lindisfarne in this case) paddles away with the anchor reel. I'm stationary but feeding the rope. The anchor comes up all the way and Lindisfarne judges when the anchor is very near the surface and stops paddling. I now have the anchor on my yak and start paddling towards Lindisfarne who in the meantime is reeling the slack line in.
     
  19. Baramundi Bob

    Baramundi Bob Super Leeds United !!!

    That sounds a good idea. Me and Mike did something similar with our brick anchor at sandsend. I was surprised how easily it came up.
     
  20. stephen

    stephen Guest

    have another good idea but haven't tried it yet so could actually be a dumb idea :embarrass:. If you are alone and need to haul an anchor up say 400 feet do the following. If your anchor is on the left hand side of the kayak attach a lead weight with a snap swivel or equivalent to the rope and start hauling . Drop the weight and surplus rope over the right hand side of the yak . The rope will sink but only to 200feet and you will have the anchor on the yak in no time. All you then need to do is reel the line in . It will be much easier reeling in a 3ounce weight than a 3lb anchor and chain.
    The reason for the lead weight is to stop having to deal with a large amount of loose line in the cockpit.
     

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