Downtide Casting Of Shads, Jellyworms And Light Pirks.

Why does one lucky angler often dominate the fishing ?
Most boat anglers cant have failed to notice that there is often one very annoying person on the boat who catches the majority of the fish.

Often without any second thought this is put down to luck, but I always remember that old saying of the great golfer Gary Player – “The more I practice the luckier I become”.

Your probably thinking, why the hell is he talking about golf. The reason is that Gary Player’s saying applies to all things in life, and indeed the more you practice at sea fishing the better you become, there is often a reason why that one person catches the majority of the fish.

Sometimes it is simply the right selection of bait or lure that the fish are feeding on at that time. Other times though all things can appear even, you have the same bait or lures but that one person still continues to catch all the fish. So what is behind this ?

A couple of years ago I spoke to Whitby Charter Skipper Paul Kilpatrick about his apparent success when fishing aboard his charter boat.

Paul explained something that at first sounded complicated but later began to sound like common sense. Paul explained that for boat fishing and especially for cod it was essential to make your pirk, lure or shad work near or on the sea bed.

Paul remarked that making the pirk work straight up and down was the key to success, and went on to explain that when the tide is running and you simply drop your pirk to the bottom it is often streaming out beyond the boat and making no contact with the bottom after only a matter of minutes – sometimes less.

When this happens it becomes impossible to work the lure straight up and down. Paul Suggested that he had given a little thought to this many years earlier and noted that if you cast your lure downtide in the direction the boat is going to drift you are able to work the lure up and down for a longer time period giving you more time when the lure is working in that optimal way for cod fishing.

Pic1. Paul Kilpatrick with a cod caught downtide with a shad.

whitby shad fishing

Pic2. Dropping straight down means it isn’t long before your line is streaming out beyond or in this case under the boat. Your lure quickly looses contact with the sea bed  and your wasting your time.

downtide pirk casting

Pic3. Casting downtide gives a longer period when you can work the lure straight up and down and in direct contact with the sea bed.

down tide lure and shad casting