Forum member Dave Adamson describes his fool proof method for anchoring his kayak in strong tides. This method also allows for easy retrieval of your kayak anchor whilst the tide is still running strong.

There are still a lot of the lads who are either unsure how to anchor or nervous of trying. Since changing kayaks to the Dorado I have found thatI needed to change my method & so I spent some time yesterday ironing out my system. For those that are intersted the following is my method.

  • 200ft 3mm cord
  • small buoy from chandler
  • 1.5kg anchor
  • A pair of small spinnaker clips

This rig is for anchoring in a maximum of 70ft on hard ground, if you intend going deeper you need a minimum of 3 times water depth & a sandy bottom might need some chain to keep it on the bottom.

In order to make the anchor trip during recovery I rig it like this, the cheap tiewraps break easily if you put a small nick in them before deployment.

kayak anchor

The complete rig, the wooden handle is just for storage and could just as easily be a divers reel or whatever pleases you, the spinnaker clips mean its a 2sec job attaching or removing the bouy.

A common problem when deploying the anchor is tangles whilst paying out, my solution to start from the other end, that is to secure the end of the line on the yak. I have 5m of line before i clip on the buoy, then sit the anchor on your lap and pay out all the line so it is trailing behind in a loop, the polyline does not tangle but if you are worried about that you could even let the top end go & the buoy float behind you, its then just a matter of paddling to the location you want to anchor & dropping it in. No tangle and you drift back with all the line already deployed until the anchor grips.

anchoring a kayak

The main advantage of the buoy is you can release from the anchor quickly, after passing the line through the anchor trolly I like to secure the end with a gibbs clip as this will release even with weight on it. because of the Dorados deep seat position I prefer to anchor stern to the tide, this gives problems when recovering so i have come up with a solution.

Moored stern first i find it hard to back up and turn the yak, with this method i can drop the line the come back head to tide & pick it back up.

The main dificulty recovering is that you need to paddle uptide and spool on the line, some exsperimentation has provided me with a safer method.
I pick up the end again & paddle uptide retrieving some slack, but leave the bouy and all the line in the water, once uptide of the anchor position i pull up until tight and a few sharp tugs will usually break the tiewrap and invert the anchor for recovery, if you have a problem and find you are starting to broadside you only need to let go. provided it lifts clear just lift the anchor and sit it on deck whilst you recover thee line at your leisure.

There may be better ways than this & I am sure its not the final solution but it works for me & gives you an easy escape if it goes wrong.

http://www.whitbyseaanglers.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=8788.0